Roadblocks to Maximum Potential in Your Church or Organization

road blocks

Just last week I was privileged to participate in a webinar by Dr. Sam Chand about the 11 Roadblocks to Maximizing Potential in your Organization.  Dr Chand gave his permission for his listeners to share this information with their friends and networks.  Below, you will find his list (in bold) along with my comments regarding his list.  You can reference his entire video by clicking here.

11 Roadblocks to Maximizing Potential in your Organization:

  • Momentum could be a bad thing – contrary to John Maxwell’s viewpoint that momentum is your best friend, Dr. Chand suggests that it can be a bad thing due to all the chaos that it brings to your church or organization.  However, if your develop new systems to handle the chaos, it is a welcomed friend.
  • Measuring the wrong things – the metrics, or measurements that we use in our churches are putting the emphasis on the wrong things.  For example, attendance and finances do not give us a picture of the health of our church.  They just tell us how much money and how many people we have.  They do not give us an idea of how we are doing with our mission of “making disciples of every nation.”  After all, what you reward gets done.  If we reward attendance, we’ll have more people, but we won’t necessarily produce disciples.
  • People in the organization don’t feel responsible to fulfill the vision – when people feel that it is the responsibility of the pastor or church leaders to do the work, it makes it nearly impossible to achieve the vision for the church.  Instead, pastors and church leaders need to learn how to communicate the vision to the entire congregation in such a way as they begin to “own it” and seek to help it reach fulfillment.
  • Unresolved conflict – conflict creates an environment in which the Holy Spirit is not free to work in the lives of the people.  Conflict must be identified, addressed, and resolved in order for the church to move forward.
  • Too much mercy – we can be so gracious and merciful that we fail to address the changes that need to happen for the church to maximize its potential.  Mercy must always be a part of any change initiative, but it cannot be the deciding factor that makes us back off of the necessary change.
  • Failure to leverage peer pressure – peer pressure doesn’t end with puberty.  It is something that we face all our lives.  Utilize it as a tool to help move the church forward to its new and better future.
  • Lack of personal improvement plans – let’s face it, most pastors and church leaders have NO plan for personal improvement.  The fact that you just read that sentence tells me that you are not most pastors or church leaders.  What is your plan for personal improvement?
  • Lack of resources – this is a reality with the small to mid-size church.  However, we need to use our God-given creativity to learn how to do more ministry with less resources.  Perhaps, we need to reallocate resources to the areas that will help the church maximize its potential.
  • Deadlines are too flexible – every time a decision is made, ask what needs done and who is responsible to see that it gets done and by what time or date.
  • Lack of support from leaders – if the leaders in your church are not behind the new initiative, it won’t happen.  Spend time getting your leaders on board.  The amount of time spent with leaders prior to launching a new initiative is directly related to the success of that new initiative.  Enough time equals success, but too little time equals failure.
  • Packing for where you’re going – always be thinking about where you are headed and what you will need with you get there.  Begin “packing” those things in your organization now.  Then, we you arrive at your new destination, you’ll be ready to enjoy it.

While this is a quick summary of the lessons taught by Dr. Chand, I want to encourage you to listen to the entire video presentation and ask yourself which of the roadblocks are you facing as you lead your church or organization?

 

The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 3

Strategic Church Leadership

In The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 1, I discussed the first two steps of the process: Clarify the Culture, and Identify the Values. Once the culture of your church has been clarified and the values identified, you can then move on to setting the goals necessary to accomplishing the vision that God has given you for your church.  In The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 2, I discussed how to plan your goals and focus your strategy for accomplishing those goals.  Click on the links above to read those posts.

Now, we turn our attention to organizing and aligning the systems of your church, and execution of your strategic plan.

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7 Lessons the Church Can Learn From Ferguson, MO

Conflict Resolution

The city of Ferguson, MO has been in the news quite a lot this past week.  Since my son and daughter-in-law live only minutes from Ferguson, I have been following the news quite closely. As I reflected on the events of what has happened, I could not help but see a parallel to the local church. When conflict arises (and it will whenever people gather together), how we deal with that conflict is crucial to the health of the local church and community. Here are a few brief lessons that the church could learn from the events in Ferguson, MO.

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The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 2

Strategic Church Leadership

In The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 1, I discussed the first two steps of the process:  Clarify the Culture, and Identify the Values.  Once the culture of your church has been clarified and the values identified, you can then move on to setting the goals necessary to accomplishing the vision that God has given you for your church.

Step Three:  PLAN THE GOALS

Developing good goals within the church setting is a difficult process.  The exception to this is when your leadership team is comprised of business leaders and executives who have been exposed to the goal setting process.  However, taking the time to help your leadership understand how to develop good goals is crucial to achieving your unique vision.  In this step, you begin to develop a list of goals that the church needs to accomplish in order to make the vision a reality.  In goal setting, it is vitally important to understand the many varied aspects that go into planning the goals for the church.  I will list a few of the major aspects here.

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The Strategic Church Leadership Process, Part 1

Strategic Church Leadership

In my previous post What is Strategic Church Leadership?, I discussed the need for an overall strategy for looking at the local church.  As pastors and church leaders, we need to set aside time in our schedules for Big Picture Thinking – looking at the church from an overall perspective.  Now, I want to begin to unpack the Strategic Church Leadership Process.  In this post, I will share the first two steps in the process and subsequent posts will share the remaining steps.  Here is the diagram that I use to explain all the steps in the process.

Strategic Church Leadership Process

Strategic Church Leadership Process

 

The process begins in the bottom right corner and progresses as you move up the right side of the mountain.  After reaching the peak, you journey back down the left side of the mountain.  Then, you move across the bottom of the mountain and begin climbing again at a deeper strategic level.  Thus, the process is an ongoing and deepening look at the strategy for the local church.

Step One:  CLARIFY THE CULTURE

This step takes a look at our current reality.  

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What is Strategic Church Leadership?

Strategic Church Leadership

Strategic Church Leadership is my new eBook outlining a simple process that I have developed to help the local church reach its full potential for God’s kingdom! Many pastors and church leaders today have a multitude of ideas and resources at their disposal. The difficulty lies not in the availability of tools for ministry. Rather, the difficulty lies in how we utilize those tools as part of an overall strategy for the local church.

With so many tools and resources available to us, why do our churches still struggle to reach their full potential?  

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The Need for “Big Picture” Thinking

We live in an era of church specialists, from the specialist on your church staff to the specialist sending advertisements about their new product to your inbox each day.  While this has created access to virtually unlimited possibilities for the church, it has also produced an unexpected side effect.  We’re losing the ability of what I call “big picture” thinking – the ability to look at the overall health and direction of the church.  So, we order that new program, or run to that new seminar, thinking it is the solution to why our church isn’t growing.  However, program after program doesn’t seem to fix the problems that we are experiencing, and in some cases, actually makes them worse.

There is a solution.  

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